Chapter 5

Step B of Procoach:
Build a Performance Profile

B: Build a performance profile

Key chapter points

  • Draw on a number of sources to identify your coachee’s current performance profile
  • Examine both quantitative and qualitative measures of performance to obtain a rounded view of performance
  • Collect data and encourage your coachee to do this also
  • Analyse performance objectively – using indicators such as KPIs to determine whether an individual’s current performance standards will enable you to achieve your team’s business objectives

As we discussed at the beginning of Chapter 2, to help your coachee grow in their role, you need to understand where they can make improvements. This might be between their agreed performance standards goal and their current level of performance.

Performance Gap

Or, if the coachee is already performing at the level required of their role, it might be that there is “coachee potential”. This is the performance potential that you know or suspect your coachee is capable of achieving.

Coachee Potential

Performance analysis options

You can analyse performance gaps and the coachee’s potential using both quantitative and qualitative evidence.

Quantitive:

  • Performance goals e.g. targets
  • Achievement of deadlines, internal or customer driven
  • Number of customer complaints

Qualitative:

  • Customer or peer feedback
  • Direct skill observation
  • Requests for re-work / correction

There are a variety of ways you can obtain quantitative and qualitative information to form a profile of the coachee.  For example, you could:

  • Use management information from your records or systems
  • Use questions to check a coachee’s knowledge levels
  • Observe the coachee performing a task
  • Ask the coachee to explain how they would currently complete specific tasks

Having completed this analysis and encouraged your coachee to do the same, you can decide on the focus areas. You can then discuss with your coachee the opportunities, to enhance their performance.

Comparing current and required performance

When analysing performance, it is important to carry out an objective measurement.

Typically businesses use metrics to signpost whether they will achieve business results. You will no doubt have measures such as these, in your own organisation. For example, your sales team might measure pipeline size, value or mix to determine the expected revenue. Metrics are therefore indicators of current performance, compared to that required.

  1. Your analysis of activity and the Qual/Quan mix will help you form a view of your coachee’s working practice
  2. You can then determine whether their efforts are likely to be sufficiently close to the required standard by checking whether your team are likely to achieve their KPIs
  3. If they are, it is a good indicator that they will meet business targets. If not, you will need to examine the gaps in knowledge, skill, and/or behavior that require your attention to close the gap
Comparing current and required performance

Case Study

David examines how he approached Step B with Emma:

David moves onto an examination of his approach to Step B. Their recent discussion about report writing helps here.

He reminds himself of the relevant performance goals whilst Emma was tasked with collecting, checking and accurately summarising data into the weekly report. She was also asked to distribute it by 5pm each Wednesday.

Emma achieved most of this, collecting and including the information she needed in the report in time for the deadline the following week.

However, the volume of queries she received about the report demonstrated to both Emma and David that she needed some help to create a clear, concise summary of the data she had collected.

David realises that in the set-up phase he had not discussed how Emma could evaluate the impact of her new report. He recognised that if he had discussed the report compilation and distribution rather than imposing his own solution Emma would have had a better grasp of how to adjust her approach from the outset. He had inadvertantly fallen into the age-old trap of creating coachee reliance by trying to cut corners at the start of the problem-solving process.

Chapter check

What have you learnt from this chapter?

Check your knowledge by answering these questions:

Self-assessment questions

  1. What are the two types of measures that will help you to build a performance profile of your coachee?
  2. What methods are available to collect information about your coachee’s current performance?

Chapter 5 – Summary & Actions

In this chapter we recommended that you:

  • Draw on a number of sources to identify your coachee’s current performance
  • Examine both quantitative and qualitative measures of performance to obtain a rounded view of
  • Collect data and encourage your coachee to do the same.
  • Analyse performance objectively – using indicators such as KPIs to determine whether an individual’s current performance standards will enable you to achieve your team’s business objectives.

Your action plan

Consider the actions you will take to encourage performance improvement in your team, department or company.

Ask yourself:

  • What sources are available to you to analyse performance? Are there any others that you should be using?
  • Are you measuring performance from both a quantitative and qualitative perspective?
  • How do you encourage your coachees to self assess their performance?
  • How do you ensure you are as objective as possible when analysing the performance of your coachees?

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